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Is Somalia a nation to be absorbed?

sawir
Wed 01 May 2019.

At times the values a nation or a society enshrines, as often claimed, may collide against the realities of that nation’s or society’s actions and behaviors in the real world.

For example, a nation may promote a mission philanthropic and humane in nature towards others, but in sheer contrast, committing heinous and grave crimes against mankind by killing or maiming civilians and innocent people in cold blood with indifference. The pretexts to justify these crimes are but political and power driven solely by interest; the containment of communism, weapons of mass destruction etc.

The life of these victims in such instances from the stand point of the perpetrator is marginal or entirely beyond the border of accountability. This is because, in the mindset of the other towards the victim in these cases is a cultivation of principles of an institution or system inculcated in the inner personality of the perpetrator throughout many years in his/her life time.

Therefore, the resultant outcome of that same experience repeatedly practiced time and again becomes a conditioned behavior equated as the norm that is generally considered accepted as universal procedures within that nation or society.

The stories of these victims are buried in pages of a few history books that in most cases are out of the readership of almost the entire general public except for a few.

In the following few paragraphs I will shed light samples and excerpts from few passages of those few history books regarding the issue in hand.

This modest article is prompted by the latest report from the Amnesty international accusing the United States of America committing war crimes in Somalia. Amnesty Internationally report states that, “USA has increased the number of air strikes ….; tripling the annual rate of attacks, and in 2018, outpacing US strikes in Libya and Yemen combined.” The report continues “Despite this escalation, the US government claims that it has not killed any civilians,” but Amnesty International

 “in this report provides credible evidence to the contrary.” And as mentioned in the quote in the following paragraph, this “habit-of denial- is a durable feature of how Americans remember war.” We can find in history parallels, century old, denials of civilian killing by the US administrations.

In November 1901, the Manila correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger reported:

The present war is no bloodless opera bouffe engagement; our men have been relentless, have killed to exterminate men, women, children, prisoner and captives, active insurgents and suspected people from lads of ten up, the idea prevailing that the Filipino as such was little better than a dog. Our soldiers have pumped salt water into men to make them talk and have taken prisoners people who held up their hands and peacefully surrendered and an hour later without an atom of evidence to show that they were even insurrectos, stood them on a bridge and shot them down one by one, to drop into the water below and float down, as examples to those who found their bullet-loaded corpses.

“An American general returning to the United states from southern Luzon said, “One-sixth of the natives of Luzon have either been killed or died of the dengue fever ……… It has been necessary to adopt what in other countries would probably be thought harsh measures.”

Elihu Root, who was the secretary of war, in responding to the charges of brutality said, “The war in the Philippines has been conducted by the American army with scrupulous regard for the rules of civilized warfare…with self-restraint and with humanity never surpassed.”    

Since the end of the WW2, the United States was engaged in three major wars, and “in each of those wars between one million and three million died, mostly civilians”. And also, as John Tirman states in his book, “The cost of war and death of the others”, “Populations and common soldiers of the “enemy” are rarely found in the narratives and dissections of conflict and this habit is a durable feature of how we remember war.”  Paul Joseph in his book entitled, “Cracks -in The Empire,” states, “The morality of US intervention in the Third World is not examined or is assumed to be beyond reproach.”  This habit, its practices in obvious manifestation in Somalia now, is far from over to change in the near foreseeable future so long as wars the US wages finds pretext, even if it is in violation to the sovereignty of an independent nations, such as Somalia.

Therefore, a question that poses itself, is whether Somalia with its current administration is a sovereign state or not? To answer this question, the political definition of a sovereign state is imperative here:

“A sovereign state is one that governs itself, independent of any foreign power, with the full authority to make war or peace and to form treaties or alliances with foreign nation”.

So, let us then determine based on this definition, if we can call Somalia a sovereign state in view of the current administration. The current Somali administration presided by the President and the Prime minister are national of foreign countries. Both, and many others in key positions in the government have given the pledge of allegiance to the countries of their citizenships. Therefore, it follows that those foreign nationals, ethnic Somalis, would take a path but dictated to them only by their countries’ interests. Considering the definition of sovereignty, are we independent of foreign power in our decision making? I think the issue does not require further discussion and elucidation as the answer is an intuitively phenomenon, discernable to people of vision and intellect.

Therefore, it is a duty of prime obligation that we the people, Somali Somalis, should reorient the narrative and direct towards its proper trajectory. Decision makers from top, to rank and file, should be in the hands of Somalis, not ethic Somalis, but who are currently foreign nationals. We can’t also claim sovereignty so long we dwell under the cottage of tribal affiliations that as apparent divided the country into antagonistic cantons. There is no way that those foreign nationals would be free in their decision making in key fateful areas of our country’s national interest. So, it is an abject disservice to this beloved country to be paddled its wheels by others to a destination that eventually and for sure would deprive the Somali people to have independence in exploiting the riches and resources of their own lands. And For the country to fall into this pit, that would be impossible for generations to come to dig it out, would be made possible by facilitators in the process; people who would only hear and obey. The late Saudi foreign Minister, Saud Al Faisal, was once quoted in the Saudi Gazette, “That in every dollar of oil revenue, we only receive 9 cents.”  He was responding to discussions that was taking place in the west to levy tax on the gas revenues because of the damage gas emission have on the Oxone layer. “The rest of the dollar money goes to the consumer and the crude oil transportation companies,” said the Minister!! We are warned!!

Somalia has become a cash cow for foreigners, a place in which business transactions reap easy and heavy profits within short period of time.

When the UN Security Council Resolution 2372(2017) called for a phased reduction and draw-down of foreign troops (TCCs), the Kampala summit on March 2nd,2018 decried the move and observed, “That the time frame and troops levels UN Security Resolution ... are not realistic and would lead to a reversal of gains made by AMISOM.” The hidden and the untold agenda behind this outcry is that no one of the participants would like the well to run dry. The irony is in Mogadishu, the capital, car explosions and suicide killings have become an almost every day occurrence. So, it is a real puzzle to make a meaningful conclusion of what the claim, “gains made by AMISOM.” means.

Although there are still many raw areas to continue discussing, I would conclude this modest article with the following:

            The United States could do more to help Somalia by carrying a chalk and a pen, rather than a gun and a bullet.

            We, Somali Somalis, can only and only defeat Al-Shabaab ,the terrorist group, by strengthening our national army and building also its moral (UN

Security Council resolution 2372 in favor). Our imam Al shafie once said, “nothing will scratch your body better than your nail.” So, the sole task of reclaiming our beloved country’s integrity and sovereignty rest only and only we, the Somalis; else not. This article doesn’t, however, carry any rope for corrupt, corrupt Somali Somalis decision makers to find comfort with. They also should be kept aloft of any decision-making posts .

If we fail to build a dam to stop the currents of the current political trend, then this country would be absorbed by the powerful ,and a time  will come that our grandchildren wake up ,finding nothing in their hands, only  to sit in shock  to heap curses  day and day out on our crumpled bones in the grave, God forbid.

Disclaimer:

I am not talking about the personality of those gentlemen, just pointing out a reality, though it may be sour to some we should swallow for the sake and safety of our beloved country.

 

At times the values a nation or a society enshrines, as often claimed, may collide against the realities of that nation’s or society’s actions and behaviors in the real world.

For example, a nation may promote a mission philanthropic and humane in nature towards others, but in sheer contrast, committing heinous and grave crimes against mankind by killing or maiming civilians and innocent people in cold blood with indifference. The pretexts to justify these crimes are but political and power driven solely by interest; the containment of communism, weapons of mass destruction etc.

The life of these victims in such instances from the stand point of the perpetrator is marginal or entirely beyond the border of accountability. This is because, in the mindset of the other towards the victim in these cases is a cultivation of principles of an institution or system inculcated in the inner personality of the perpetrator throughout many years in his/her life time.

Therefore, the resultant outcome of that same experience repeatedly practiced time and again becomes a conditioned behavior equated as the norm that is generally considered accepted as universal procedures within that nation or society.

The stories of these victims are buried in pages of a few history books that in most cases are out of the readership of almost the entire general public except for a few.

In the following few paragraphs I will shed light samples and excerpts from few passages of those few history books regarding the issue in hand.

This modest article is prompted by the latest report from the Amnesty international accusing the United States of America committing war crimes in Somalia. Amnesty Internationally report states that, “USA has increased the number of air strikes ….; tripling the annual rate of attacks, and in 2018, outpacing US strikes in Libya and Yemen combined.” The report continues “Despite this escalation, the US government claims that it has not killed any civilians,” but Amnesty International

 “in this report provides credible evidence to the contrary.” And as mentioned in the quote in the following paragraph, this “habit-of denial- is a durable feature of how Americans remember war.” We can find in history parallels, century old, denials of civilian killing by the US administrations.

In November 1901, the Manila correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger reported:

The present war is no bloodless opera bouffe engagement; our men have been relentless, have killed to exterminate men, women, children, prisoner and captives, active insurgents and suspected people from lads of ten up, the idea prevailing that the Filipino as such was little better than a dog. Our soldiers have pumped salt water into men to make them talk and have taken prisoners people who held up their hands and peacefully surrendered and an hour later without an atom of evidence to show that they were even insurrectos, stood them on a bridge and shot them down one by one, to drop into the water below and float down, as examples to those who found their bullet-loaded corpses.

“An American general returning to the United states from southern Luzon said, “One-sixth of the natives of Luzon have either been killed or died of the dengue fever ……… It has been necessary to adopt what in other countries would probably be thought harsh measures.”

Elihu Root, who was the secretary of war, in responding to the charges of brutality said, “The war in the Philippines has been conducted by the American army with scrupulous regard for the rules of civilized warfare…with self-restraint and with humanity never surpassed.”    

Since the end of the WW2, the United States was engaged in three major wars, and “in each of those wars between one million and three million died, mostly civilians”. And also, as John Tirman states in his book, “The cost of war and death of the others”, “Populations and common soldiers of the “enemy” are rarely found in the narratives and dissections of conflict and this habit is a durable feature of how we remember war.”  Paul Joseph in his book entitled, “Cracks -in The Empire,” states, “The morality of US intervention in the Third World is not examined or is assumed to be beyond reproach.”  This habit, its practices in obvious manifestation in Somalia now, is far from over to change in the near foreseeable future so long as wars the US wages finds pretext, even if it is in violation to the sovereignty of an independent nations, such as Somalia.

Therefore, a question that poses itself, is whether Somalia with its current administration is a sovereign state or not? To answer this question, the political definition of a sovereign state is imperative here:

“A sovereign state is one that governs itself, independent of any foreign power, with the full authority to make war or peace and to form treaties or alliances with foreign nation”.

So, let us then determine based on this definition, if we can call Somalia a sovereign state in view of the current administration. The current Somali administration presided by the President and the Prime minister are national of foreign countries. Both, and many others in key positions in the government have given the pledge of allegiance to the countries of their citizenships. Therefore, it follows that those foreign nationals, ethnic Somalis, would take a path but dictated to them only by their countries’ interests. Considering the definition of sovereignty, are we independent of foreign power in our decision making? I think the issue does not require further discussion and elucidation as the answer is an intuitively phenomenon, discernable to people of vision and intellect.

Therefore, it is a duty of prime obligation that we the people, Somali Somalis, should reorient the narrative and direct towards its proper trajectory. Decision makers from top, to rank and file, should be in the hands of Somalis, not ethic Somalis, but who are currently foreign nationals. We can’t also claim sovereignty so long we dwell under the cottage of tribal affiliations that as apparent divided the country into antagonistic cantons. There is no way that those foreign nationals would be free in their decision making in key fateful areas of our country’s national interest. So, it is an abject disservice to this beloved country to be paddled its wheels by others to a destination that eventually and for sure would deprive the Somali people to have independence in exploiting the riches and resources of their own lands. And For the country to fall into this pit, that would be impossible for generations to come to dig it out, would be made possible by facilitators in the process; people who would only hear and obey. The late Saudi foreign Minister, Saud Al Faisal, was once quoted in the Saudi Gazette, “That in every dollar of oil revenue, we only receive 9 cents.”  He was responding to discussions that was taking place in the west to levy tax on the gas revenues because of the damage gas emission have on the Oxone layer. “The rest of the dollar money goes to the consumer and the crude oil transportation companies,” said the Minister!! We are warned!!

Somalia has become a cash cow for foreigners, a place in which business transactions reap easy and heavy profits within short period of time.

When the UN Security Council Resolution 2372(2017) called for a phased reduction and draw-down of foreign troops (TCCs), the Kampala summit on March 2nd,2018 decried the move and observed, “That the time frame and troops levels UN Security Resolution ... are not realistic and would lead to a reversal of gains made by AMISOM.” The hidden and the untold agenda behind this outcry is that no one of the participants would like the well to run dry. The irony is in Mogadishu, the capital, car explosions and suicide killings have become an almost every day occurrence. So, it is a real puzzle to make a meaningful conclusion of what the claim, “gains made by AMISOM.” means.

Although there are still many raw areas to continue discussing, I would conclude this modest article with the following:

            The United States could do more to help Somalia by carrying a chalk and a pen, rather than a gun and a bullet.

            We, Somali Somalis, can only and only defeat Al-Shabaab ,the terrorist group, by strengthening our national army and building also its moral (UN

Security Council resolution 2372 in favor). Our imam Al shafie once said, “nothing will scratch your body better than your nail.” So, the sole task of reclaiming our beloved country’s integrity and sovereignty rest only and only we, the Somalis; else not. This article doesn’t, however, carry any rope for corrupt, corrupt Somali Somalis decision makers to find comfort with. They also should be kept aloft of any decision-making posts .

If we fail to build a dam to stop the currents of the current political trend, then this country would be absorbed by the powerful ,and a time  will come that our grandchildren wake up ,finding nothing in their hands, only  to sit in shock  to heap curses  day and day out on our crumpled bones in the grave, God forbid.

Disclaimer:

I am not talking about the personality of those gentlemen, just pointing out a reality, though it may be sour to some we should swallow for the sake and safety of our beloved country.

 

 



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